Journal of Mental Health and Human Behaviour

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2014  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 78--82

Neurocognitive deficits in obsessive compulsive disorder: A state or trait phenomenon?


Sachin Sharma1, Supriya Vaish1, JK Trivedi2, PK Dalal2 
1 Department of Psychiatry, Subharti Medical College, Meerut, India
2 Department of Psychiatry, King George Medical College, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Supriya Vaish
134, Ram Sadan, Baghpat Road, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh
India

Background: Studies have shown that in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), there is impairment of neurocognitive functioning during the symptomatic phase. However, studies that explore the DQstate or traitDQ dependent nature of these neurocognitive deficits are largely lacking. By comparing the neuropsychological functions of the clinical and subclinical group of OCD patients and healthy controls; we tried to establish whether neuropsychological deficits in OCD were DQstateDQ dependent or independent. Materials and Methods: Twenty DQmild to moderateDQ OCD patients, 15 subclinical (remitted) OCD patients, and 20 matched healthy controls were compared and assessed on computerized battery of neuropsychological tests including Wisconsin card sorting test, continuous performance test, and spatial working memory test. The observations were statistically analyzed. Results: Executive functions in both the subclinical and clinical groups performed poorly when compared to healthy controls. The patient groups made significantly more wrong responses, more missed responses and took more time to respond. On the test of spatial working memory, the mild to moderate OCD patients showed significant impairment, but not the subclinical patients group. Conclusion: Thus, we conclude that cognitive dysfunctions are core and enduring deficits of OCD, they seem to continue into the subclinical- well state. Certain cognitive deficits, depending on their presence or absence in subclinical cases, may be identified as DQstateDQ or DQtraitDQ markers of OCD.


How to cite this article:
Sharma S, Vaish S, Trivedi J K, Dalal P K. Neurocognitive deficits in obsessive compulsive disorder: A state or trait phenomenon?.J Mental Health Hum Behav 2014;19:78-82


How to cite this URL:
Sharma S, Vaish S, Trivedi J K, Dalal P K. Neurocognitive deficits in obsessive compulsive disorder: A state or trait phenomenon?. J Mental Health Hum Behav [serial online] 2014 [cited 2021 Apr 17 ];19:78-82
Available from: https://www.jmhhb.org/article.asp?issn=0971-8990;year=2014;volume=19;issue=2;spage=78;epage=82;aulast=Sharma;type=0